Stigma is still biggest hurdle to treating depression
Mental Health

Stigma is still biggest hurdle to treating depression

An interesting piece in one of Canada’s dailies today, highlighting how societal perceptions of mental illness are preventing people from seeking treatment. We really can’t move forward with mental health issues until we break down the walls of shame and secrecy surrounding them. Continue reading

Ungrateful Bitch (Part1)
Autobiographical Posts / Mental Health

Ungrateful Bitch (Part1)

My heart thuds and there’s a rushing noise in my ears, like a subway train. A single thought fills my head, ” I HAVE to get away.” My feet pound the asphalt and I risk a lightening glance over my shoulder at my pursuer. “Oh my God, he’s gaining on me!” Panic squeezes me in it’s icy, iron grip and my belief in my ability to outrun him vanishes. Continue reading

A Matter of Faith
Bridging Cultures / Islam

A Matter of Faith

I remember the furore about Salman Rushdie’s “The Satanic Verses”, and the apoplexy over the Danish newspaper cartoon depictions of the prophet Muhammad (ﷺ). When the Monty Python film “Life of Brian” was released it was shunned by the big broadcasting corporations and banned by borough councils around Britain. But is making it illegal to criticise religion the way to go? Continue reading

The Gift of Hope
Writing

The Gift of Hope

I am both flattered and touched to have been nominated for a HUG Award© from the talented Julie Dawn Fox, the inspiration behind the “Personal A-Z” phenomenon and author of one of a number of excellent blogs coming out of Portugal right now.
You can find out more about The HUG Award© and it’s purpose here, but briefly, it’s aim is to keep hope alive in a world filled with difficulty and discord. It recognises and honours those who do what they can to help others regardless of belief, ability, race and gender Continue reading

Smooth Moves for Expat Kids – tips to ease the transition
Expat Life

Smooth Moves for Expat Kids – tips to ease the transition

Moving to another country with children can be a stressful experience. The tearful confession, “I want to go home,” is the last thing any parent wants to hear. Adults will be going through their own period of adjustment and this, coupled with the logistical matters that lay claim to their time in the early days, can leave them ill-equipped to give their children the help they need to cope with the transition.
The good news is that, when properly prepared and supported, children often adjust more quickly than adults. Continue reading